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Cells and Control

Question

What would happen to a red blood cells when you put in hypotonic solutions?

3 years ago

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2 Replies

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O

Orval Runolfsson


2 Answers

Tara S Profile Picture
Tara S Verified Sherpa Tutor ✓

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Hypotonic solutions have a high water potential. This means that if a red blood cell was to be placed into the solution, water would move from the solution (high concentration) to the red blood cell (low concentration) via osmosis. As the red blood cell does not have a cell wall, it is likely that the cell would burst due to gain of water.

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Pauline H Profile Picture
Pauline H Verified Sherpa Tutor ✓

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At a GCSE level hypotonic solutions have high water potential meaning the water would move from the solution to the red blood cells. As these are animal cells they would continue to take in water and burst - plant cells will become turgid.


Heres a great video of the process. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8cI6FkcG4c

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