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What type ...

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What type of energy does anything stretched has?

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Colby Bartell


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How much energy is lost when 3 kg of water cools down from 75 degrees Celsius to 50 degrees Celsius? How much energy is lost when 2 kg of water cools down from 70 degrees Celsius to 50 degrees Celsius? How much energy is lost when 4 kg of water cools down from 80 degrees Celsius to 50 degrees Celsius? How much energy is lost when 1 kg of water cools down from 50 degrees Celsius to 40 degrees Celsius? How much energy is lost when 7 kg of water cools down from 70 degrees Celsius to 50 degrees Celsius? If a 4.5 kg brick is heated from 30 degrees Celsius by 500,000 J, how hot would it get? If a 5.5 kg brick is heated from 40 degrees Celsius by 500,000 J, how hot would it get? If a 7.5 kg brick is heated from 25 degrees Celsius by 500,000 J, how hot would it get? If a 3.5 kg brick is heated from 30 degrees Celsius by 500,000 J, how hot would it get? If a 2.5 kg brick is heated from 45 degrees Celsius by 500,000 J, how hot would it get? What happens when you change the internal energy of a material? What is the difference between specific heat capacity and specific latent heat? How can you calculate the amount of thermal energy stored as the temperature of a system changes? How can you calculate the amount of thermal energy released as the temperature of a system changes? How much energy is needed to freeze 300 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? How much energy is needed to freeze 200 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? How much energy is needed to free 450 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? How much energy is needed to free 700 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? How much energy is needed to free 700 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? How much energy is needed to free 700 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? How much energy is needed to free 170 grams of water from 0 degrees Celsius? True or false: When we talk about pressure, we’re talking about the amount of force pressing down on an object. Complete the sentence: Pressure is force divided by _____. Why does atmospheric pressure decrease with height? How are pressure, force and area linked? How many newtons/metre2 is one pascal? How many newtons/metre2 is two pascals? How many newtons/metre2 is three pascals? Is there more or less atmosphere above you on top of a mountain? Explain your answer. True or false: An object in water experiences water pressure from all directions. At what point does a boat start to float after it sinks lower into the water? When will an object sink? Explain your answer, including the term ‘upthrust’ Why might someone wearing stilettos sink into the snow? What happens in the upthrust is greater than an object’s weight? What happens if the upthrust is smaller than an object’s weight? True or false: At sea level, atmosphere weighs nothing. Describe the directional movement of particles in a gas. Do particles in a gas tend to move quickly or slowly? Explain your answer. 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If a gas has a pressure of 100,000 Pa when it is in a volume of 20 m3, what will its pressure be if the volume is reduced to 3 m3? If a gas has a pressure of 200,000 Pa when it is in a volume of 5 m3, what will its pressure be if the volume is reduced to 1 m3? What does decreasing the volume of a gas cause the particles in a gas to do? What effect does increasing the temperature of a gas have on its collisions? What does the term ‘inversely proportionate’ mean? Complete the sentence: Forces applied to the particle in a gas mean that energy is ______. What is a piston? What happens when a piston is pressed down on a column of gas? Where does mechanical work transfer energy from and to? Describe the relationship between a gas and its container. Explain what causes the pressure exerted by a gas. True or false: Only the force per collision increases when a gas is heated but the volume does not change. True or false: Only the number of collisions taking place per second increases when a gas is heated but the volume does not change. What happens to a gas when it is squashed at constant temperature? If the pressure on a gas is doubled, what happens to the volume of the gas? If the pressure on a gas is quadrupled, what happens to the volume of the gas? Which variable must be controlled when testing how the pressure of a gas varies with its volume? Explain your answer. Why does a bicycle pump get warmer when it compresses a gas? How do gas particles move inside a helium balloon? Why does a boat float but a penny sink? Explain the concept of floating and sinking and why some objects sink but some float. Draw a particle picture for a gas. Draw a particle picture for a solid. Draw a particle picture for a liquid. Why don’t gas particles fall to the bottom of a beaker? Why are some substances gases at room temperature but others are solid? Do gases have large or small spaces between particles? Explain your answer. True or false: Only some matter in the Universe is made of particles. What is gas pressure caused by? Explain your answer. When does pressure not increase with temperature? What happens to the volume of a helium balloon as its rises? Explain the command word ‘calculate’ in an exam question context. Explain the command word ‘define’ in an exam question context. Explain the command word ‘suggest’ in an exam question context. Explain the command word ‘determine’ in an exam question context. What is an energy system? Complete the sentence: An energy system is a group of _____ that are able to do work. Complete the sentence: An energy system is a group of objects that are able to do ____. What happens when work is done? What type of energy is stored in batteries? What type of energy is stored in fuel? What type of energy is stored in moving objects? What type of energy is stored in an object above the planet’s surface? What type of energy is stored in a stretched object? What type of energy is stored in a compressed object? What type of energy is stored in a twisted object? What type of energy is stored in a heated object? What type of energy is stored in an object with a magnetic field? What type of energy is stored in electrostatic forces between charges? What is nuclear energy? What are electromagnetic waves also known as? Describe the transfer of energy that takes place when you throw a tennis ball upwards. Describe the transfer of energy that takes place when a bowling ball hits a pin. Describe the transfer of energy that takes place when you kick a football. Describe the energy transfer that takes place when you boil water for a cup of tea. Describe the energy transfer that takes place when you apply the brakes in a car. True or false: Energy is measured in Joules. True or false: Energy is measured in watts. What does the symbol ‘J’ stand for? Define the term ‘efficiency’. What is the amount of useful energy you get from an energy transfer compared to the energy put in known as? Complete the sentence: Efficiency can be calculated from the power t______. Is nuclear energy difficult to extract? Is nuclear energy difficult to purify? Is nuclear energy plentiful? Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear energy. Why are fossil fuels becoming more difficult to find and extract? Why are fossil fuels becoming more difficult to find and extract? How are energy resources used in day-to-day life? What are the four economic sectors between which energy use is divided? What is a scalar? What is a vector? Define the term ‘momentum’. Define the term ‘gravity’. Which two groups can you place forces into, contact and ….? How much work is done when a box is pushed 5m across the floor with a force of 150 N? How much work is done when a box is pushed 10m across the floor with a force of 300 N? How much work is done when a box is pushed 4m across the floor with a force of 16 N? How much work is done when a box is pushed 7m across the floor with a force of 20 N? How much work is done when a box is pushed 8m across the floor with a force of 6 N? How much work is done when a box is pushed 9m across the floor with a force of 30 N? What is the typical speed of walking? What is the typical speed of running? What is the typical speed of cycling? What is the speed of a bike travelling 1000m in 100 seconds? What is the speed of a bike travelling 500m in 50 seconds? How long will it take a car to complete a car journey, travelling 400 miles at an average speed of 40 mph? How do you calculate stopping distance? What is stopping distance? What is the difference between thinking and braking distance? What is the highway code? True or false: When you double your speed, your thinking distance will also double. True or false: When you triple your speed, your thinking distance will also triple. What is a reaction time? Name three factors which affect reaction time. True or false: Reaction time affects thinking distance. True or false: When the speed of a vehicle doubles, the kinetic energy of the vehicle becomes four times greater. Why does the kinetic energy of the vehicle become four times greater when its speed doubles? What is the reaction time of a typical person? Does alcohol increase or decrease reaction time? Does caffeine increase or decrease reaction time? Does tiredness increase or decrease reaction time? Do distractions increase or decrease reaction time? Do drugs increase or decrease reaction time? Why do some drugs increase reaction time, but some decrease reaction time? How can a reaction time be measured? How can a ruler be used to measure reaction time? Does increasing speed increase or decrease braking distance? Does increasing the weight of a vehicle increase or decrease braking distance? Do icy roads increase or decrease braking distance? Do wet roads increase or decrease braking distance? Do poor brake conditions increase or decrease braking distance? Do bald tyres increase or decrease braking distance? Do bald tyres increase or decrease braking distance? Name some factors that affect the braking distance of a vehicle. Complete the sentence: The nuclei of some atoms are u_____. How do unstable nuclei become more stable? Describe the process of radioactive decay. What is the term for the rate at which a source of unstable nuclei decays? What does the unit ‘Bq’ stand for? What are becquerels used to measure? Define the term ‘count-rate’. What is the name for the number of decays recorded each second by a detector? What might a Geiger-Muller tube be used to measure? Define the term ‘isotype’. What are the three different types of radioactive decay? Where do the three types of radioactive decay come from? True or false: The three types of radioactive decay come from the nucleus. How many protons does alpha consist of? How many neutrons does alpha consist of? Does alpha have a positive or negative charge? Why does alpha have a positive charge? What does beta consist of? Are beta particles positively or negatively charged? What is the symbol for beta? What is the symbol for alpha? What is the symbol for gamma? True or false: Gamma radiation has no mass. True or false: Gamma radiation has no electrical charge. What are gamma rays? What is alpha easily stopped by? What is alpha easily stopped by? What is beta stopped by? What is gamma stopped by? True or false: Alpha, beta and gamma can penetrate different materials. Why do we see different colours? Why do we see different colours? How can white light be dispersed? Complete the sentence: White light can be dispersed by a _____. What is the colour of light related to? Why is white light not just a single colour? True or false: White light is a mix of colours. When do the different colours of white light show up? Define the term ‘dispersal’. What is the proper name for a rainbow effect created by the splitting up of white light? What does the dispersal of white light give? What is the order of colours shown up when white light hits a prism? Complete the sentence: A mixture of colours shows up when white light hits a r______. Complete the sentence: The splitting up of light is called d______.