Question

How do I develop a point?

1 year ago

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12 Replies

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1189 views

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Lauretta Block


12 Replies

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Mary Broad Best Answer!

In a broad sense, the PEE (Point, Evidence, Explanation) is a good guide to develop a point in writing.

Firstly, introduce your point in your own words. Secondly, use evidence to support your point, such as a quote or cited evidence with a reference. Then, explain how and why this evidence supports your point, including your own interpretation and a critical lens. Last, remember to link your point back to the question by explaining how it helps support or refute the argument you are making.

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Luke Navato Best Answer!

Some people use the PEE acronym to help them remember how to develop a point. This stands for P - Point E - Evidence E- Explanation.


The crucial thing to understand is that in order for a point to be made well, you must back up what your argument is with specific evidence and then provide an analysis or explanation of why it is relevant to the question you are answering. Examiners want you to fulfil assessment objectives on the curriculum.


For instance, in English you might have AO2 (Assessment Objective 2): the objective of: 'Analysing the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate'. So in order to fulfil this objective, we should make a (point) P, for instance: Thomas Hardy uses short sentences and alliteration... E: (Evidence) 'insert the relevant quote which demonstrates short sentences and alliteration... followed by E: (Explanation) 'this ramps up the sense of suspense for the reader which makes them sympathise with Tess and reinforces their sense of fear and antagonism towards Alec'.


Remember, when making a point, do not assume the reader / examiner knows what you mean. You have to make it very clear what interesting point you are making, where it is within the text, and why it is this way; what implications are entailed?

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Khadija Ali Best Answer!

In order to develop a point you need to 'flesh it out.'

First you need to make your point as clear and concise as possible. Then you need to use evidence (usually quotations from the text) to support your given point. Here is where most of our 'fleshing' comes. You need to analyse any language techniques in your quotation and their effect. It is vital to include the effect, this is where you get most of your marks. Pulling apart your quotation and analysing the effect is the main aspect of developing a point. The last thing you need to do is link your point back to the initial statement/question.


My Example:


The aforementioned passage from Chinua Achebe’s ‘Things Fall Apart’ (1958) explores the detrimental effects of toxic masculinity.  From the outset of the extract, Okonkwo is depicted as the archetypal alpha male with Achebe noting that he ‘ruled his household with a heavy hand.’ The use of the possessive pronoun ‘his’ is repeated several times in the extract, emphasising Okonkwo’s controlling nature. The alliterative ‘h’ on ‘heavy hand’ reiterates his violent tendencies, and the use of ‘heavy’ is symbolic of his overbearing presence as a patriarch. Thus, Achebe's characterisation of Oknonkwo highlights the nature of toxic masculinity.

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Luke Pyke-Terrett Best Answer!

The essential structure to any point is the 'statement', 'the explanation' and then 'the proof'. This means making sure that you explain what it is youre trying to say initially, usally something short and simple. Following this up with some deeping explainations and context and finially give an example of the point you're trying to make which demonstrates your point.

Emma R Profile Picture
Emma R Best Answer!

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Hello Miss. Lauretta. When you are making a point, it is always a good idea to check you have read and understood what the question is asking - please do this carefully! You can then answer by making a point and expanding on that point. This shows that you have understood the question, fully. There is a technique you can use called the PEEL technique; Point, Evidence, Explain, and Link. To do this, you make your point, include evidence for that point - (you can do this by using a quote, link, diagram, or picture). You can then expand on this by explaining your point and its evidence clearly, finally, using a sentence or two to link this to the next point you will make. I hope this is clear for you and that you find it to be useful. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask.

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Sarah B Profile Picture
Sarah B Best Answer!

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Hello,


When writing an answer it's very important to keep your point brief and clear. You can do this by focusing on the following steps and making sure your evidence and point match

  1. Highlight the key words in the question. What are you looking for? What should you be focusing on?
  2. Read the extract
  3. Underline or highlight anything in the extract which shows the keyword in the question
  4. Add a couple of words about WHAT your chosen quote shows and WHY/HOW...this could be your point!



I hope this helps!


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Matthew Birch Best Answer!

A really good way of developing a point is understanding the argument you are making which means you make that point. For example, you want to develop on the point "Meat-eating is a polluter of carbon emissions". To develop this, gather some factual evidence to back up your point, and you could even then break that evidence down- to prove how reliable it is, thus backing up your point further, before possibly evaluating if perhaps your argument has two sides to it, which in this case might be, for example, "We should switch to a plant-based diet".

Michael R Profile Picture
Michael R Best Answer!

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There are a few techniques you can use to develop your point, one of those being what I call a PETER paragraph structure. This technique helps you to further emphasise your point with evidence and analysis of that evidence, I'll explain:


P - Point "Peter is angry in this section."

E - Evidence. This is shown in the quotation, "..." Use evidence from the extract or text you are discussing.

T - Technique, outline what language techniques the writer has used which support your point. E.g. adjectives, metaphors, use of rhetorical questions, etc.

E - Explain. Explain the effects of language techniques the writer has used.

R - Reader. How do we as a reader respond to this? or how do you think the writer wants the reader to feel?


Hope this helps!


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Mikaela Policala Best Answer!

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A point is developed through arguments sustained by clear examples of acquired or learnt content of experience.

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Zayanne Bako Best Answer!

The best method to use when developing a point is PEEL ( Point, Evidence, Explain, Link). Once you've found the point you want o explore in further detail, try and find evidence, for example quotes from the text, to further reinforce your point. After finding evidence, always explain what the point suggests, how it makes the reader feel and how your point adds to the text as a whole. Once you've explained, always try and link your point to the question given to you, one because it adds structure to your answer and two because it will help you flow into your next point a lot easier.

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Habib Akram Best Answer!

Hi, when trying to develop a point in general I recommend you use the PEEL structure to help make your answer be shaped as accurate and well-developed as possible. The PEEL structure refers to firstly making your point then backing it up with Evidence usually in quote form. Next, you should explain the evidence you have provided and finally link your paragraph to the designated question. I hope this can help.

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Lucy C Best Answer!

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Your point does not need to be too long. The key to this is focusing on the following steps and making sure your evidence and point match

  1. Underline the key words in the question. What are you looking for? What should you be focusing on?
  2. Read the extract
  3. Underline or highlight anything in the extract which shows the keyword in the question
  4. Add a couple of words about WHAT your chosen quote shows and WHY/HOW...this could be your point!

Use the keywords in the question to help you.


For example:

How does the writer use language and structure to show the narrator finds the experience difficult? Support your views with reference to the text.

My point could be: The writer shows Pip is finding his journey difficult by describing the weather negatively.


In your explanation, you should develop your point and link back to your evidence. Ask yourself HOW and WHY does the quote show your point/what the question is asking you. Explain this HOW and WHY in your explanation.


I hope this helps!

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