Question

Should all of my points be backed up with evidence?

1 year ago

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27 Replies

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1323 views

C

Cordia Torp


27 Replies

Kristina M Profile Picture
Kristina M Best Answer!

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Yes! This will help you massively in being able to stay focused on specific elements of the writing that you are analysing!

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Manoor Khan Best Answer!

Not necessarily, as long as most points are backed up with evidence, the rest of your points may have other reasoning such as analysing them against your other points.

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MILLY JONES Best Answer!

Yes, wherever possible. You never want to make a blanket statement and have no evidence to prove this or back it up.

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Clare Best Answer!

It is best if your points are backed up with evidence to prove they are true. Of course some points may be true without evidence but to persuade your audience that your points are legitimate it is best to back them up with as much evidence as possible. But remember, you need to make sure your sources are reliable, particularly in scientific writing.

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Millie Best Answer!

I find that the structure PEA is a great guideline - make your point, bring in the evidence to support it, then finish with an analysis of this evidence and how it is relevant to your initial point. Make sure that it is relevant evidence though!

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Hafsah Nur Best Answer!

Yes, your main points needs to have evidence, such as quotes, to back up what you are trying to comment on. There will be stronger quotes than others, the more you can infer from a quote the stronger it is.

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Eliza Waters Best Answer!

Yes. This will then support your ideas and give you deeper levels of explanation and implicit and explicit meaning in your analysis.

Karim T Profile Picture
Karim T Best Answer!

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This depends on the subject id it's a factual subject then yes evidence or examples would be a good idea. However if it's a debate or essay based question you could give your opinion then back it up with reasoned arguments that make sense and are not too one sided or biased.

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Victoria O Profile Picture
Victoria O Best Answer!

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If you are making a point that is common knowledge (say, New York City is in the state of New York, for example), then there is no reason to cite the source. However, let's say you're talking about the first settlers of NYC and you're including details about their daily lives, etc., then you would need to support the points you're making with properly cited evidence. The difference is that one of these examples is common knowledge and the other requires research to learn about or understand.

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Jake B Profile Picture
Jake B Best Answer!

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I would suggest so. Either a direct quote or direct reference to a moment or part of the text.

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Jess Best Answer!

Yes, every point within your answer should be backed up with evidence. All of your points are inspired by the text so you need evidence, such as quotes or a specific scene from the text, to support these ideas. These quotes, however, need to relate to the point to back it up properly, otherwise a random quote won't support your point.

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Miranda Stevenson Best Answer!

Yes. When you make a point in an essay, you need to be able to support it with evidence or else your reader will not be able to trust your argument. Providing evidence for your points will also allow you to develop them into a stronger, more convincing piece of writing. The main way you can do this is by providing examples that you feel prove your point from a source text. However, providing evidence alone is not necessarily sufficient. You should also ensure that you are explaining why you chose to include that evidence and how it relates to the point that you are making. By doing this, you will be creating a strong argument and also creating a natural flow to your writing.

Martina M Profile Picture
Martina M Best Answer!

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The short answer to this question is yes. The rule of English Literature GCSE and A level is that not only are the examiners looking for detailed and original interpretations and careful analysis of language, but the main focus should be the relationship between these two. The evidence you furnish for your interpretation should be the analysis of the language, the connection should be evident and elaborated because one without the other will not allow you to gain the marks you'll need to achieve the top grades. All the points you make in an essay should be backed up by evidence from the text so that you show the examiner you know the text well, and by doing this you should hopefully be able to not only explore the language on a deeper level, but also connect relevant context and literary theories that help you achieve the very top band of marks.

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Krissi Hadley Profile Picture
Krissi Hadley Best Answer!

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If you've got a point to make, prove it. It makes the writing more credible and, also, the reader can then go and verify your points. There are many different ways to back up your points, so the writing doesn't feel stale, but as a rule of thumb; If you have a point to make, and you have the quote/text/line/study to back it up, mention it. Even if its in annotations.

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Shekinah S Profile Picture
Shekinah S Best Answer!

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Hi Cordia,


This is a great question!


It is more effective to make a point that is backed up with evidence in order to identify your point in the text and demonstrate how you've reached to the point you wish to make. I strongly recommend using text based evidence (e.g. quotes) when essay writing, however, you could also try referring to a particular theme or literary devise that is conveyed or emphasised (these are also examples of evidence). Do not feel restricted to analysing quotations alone; experiment.


Hope this helps.

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