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Rates of Change

Question

How do you find the rate of change?

1 year ago

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165 Replies

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5784 views

V

Vickie Shanahan


165 Answers

H
Harris Asghar

divide the change in y-values by the change in x-values

J
James Mcfarlane

Rate of change of what?

The rate of change of anything is usually given by its end value, minus its start value, divided by time

for example momentum=0 at t=0s, and momentum=5 at t=10s, rate of change = (5-0)/10 = 5/10 = 1/2

A
An Nguyen

rate of change = (change in quantity 1)/ (change in quantity 2)

S
Soufyan Soogun

Find the change in y, and divide it by the change in x!


For example...


On a graph, we may find two points (5,4) and (6,8).

We can calculate rate of change by taking the x values (5 and 6), and finding the difference between them (6-5=1). We do the same for the y values (4 and 8), with the difference being 4.


Therefore, the rate of change = 4 / 1 = 4!

A
Angie Muyeke

The rate of change can be found on a straight-line graph by selecting two coordinates and dividing the change in the y-values by the change in the x-values. This can be shown in the formula : m = y2-y1/ x2-x1 with m representing the gradient of the straight-line. Additionally, x and y can be two different variables and the formula is used to calculate average speed or average velocity.The rate of change of a straight line is equivalent to the gradient of a straight line graph. However, we use differentiation with non-linear graphs to find the rate of change at a particular point. This is another topic in itself.


F
Finn Mortimore

If we have a graph, the rate of change at a particular point is the gradient of the tangent at that point - this is known as the derivative. Given some values, we could approximate the rate of change by calculating the gradient of the graph of those values at that point i.e. rise over run

S
Stavros Savva

Divide the change of one variable with the change of the other variable

F
Faizan Ahmed

For a linear set of values the rate of change will be the change in y-values divided by the change in x-values in other words the gradient of a straight line. In the set of values relating to a curved line the rate of change on each point can be found by differentiating the equation of that curve and using the values of x of the point you need to find the rate of change at.

M
Meharpreet Singh

You find the charge and divide it by the quantity

B
Behrad

Rate of Change = (Change in Output) / (Change in Input)

  • Change in Output: This refers to the difference between the final and initial values of the quantity you're measuring (often denoted by y).
  • Change in Input: This refers to the difference between the final and initial values of the independent variable (often denoted by x).


M
Melisa

The rate of change = change in y over change in x , if you are given 2 coordinates e.g (2,0) (3,3) and you want to find the rate of change. You would simply do 3-0 / 3-1 which would give you 3/2. This will give you a gradient y=3/2x + c. To find c you would simply sub one of the coordinates back in to this equation.

A
Aishwarya Bandaru

The rate of change is also known as the gradient or slope.


Rate of change = (change in quantity 1) / (change in quantity 2)


Given 2 points (x1, y1) and (x2, y2), the rate of change between them is:

Δy / Δx = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1)

J
Jess

The change in the y axis divided by the change in the x-axis

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The Rate of change (ROC) is the increase or decrease of one value related to another value.

The speed of a car for instance is the distance covered divided by the time taken.

In mathematics this can be the gradient of a graph in general terms.

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We can find the rate of change by calculating the gradient of the curve or line. We identify two points on the line. Next we find the difference in the y-axis points and divide by the difference in the x-axis points. E.g. (Y2 - Y1)/(X2 - X1)

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